Creativity

March 28, 2022 By Admin

Brene Brown says, “Unused creativity is not benign. It metastasizes. It turns into grief, rage, judgement, sorrow, shame.” We have to find a way to create, and not care what others think. “I'm not very creative” doesn't work. There's no such thing as creative people and non-creative people. There are only people who use their creativity and people who don't.

I don’t think creativity has to fit into specific parameters. For some people, being creative is being able to paint, draw, sing, or play an instrument. So when they are not good at any of these creative activities, they don’t consider themselves creative. Think about what you create, change, improve, initiate in your life. I have seen people who use their lawn as a palette. Hairdressers do it with each head of hair. Tattooist tattoo.

I find that time fades when I’m in that zone. It’s just me and Springsteen music in the room. I’m not ruminating on that guy at work I want to get hit by a bus. I’m not fighting with the wife, work stuff, deadlines etc… I look up and two hours have disappeared.

I also like the surprises. When you meet people, and you find out that they do things you would not expect. I recall the Susan Boyle audition on Britain’s Got Talent. Who knew? I have done things that I really like that do not illicit much excitement or attention, but every once in a while someone will say, “That’s cool. I see what you did there.”

So go needle point, work on your novel, collect flags, quilt, rap, bonsai sculpture, or calligraph to your little heart's content.

 

Ten guideposts for wholehearted living. Brené Brown. (2021, November 10). Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://brenebrown.com/resources/ten-guideposts-for-wholehearted-living/

John Randall is an intern at Samaritan Counseling Center. He is a Lamar University graduate. His career consist of being an Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighter at Jack Brooks Regional Airport for 20 years. He was the Fire Chief at the airport until becoming Director of the Fire Academy at Lamar Institute of Technology in 2014. He is also 33-year veteran of the Army and Texas Air National Guard. As this portion of his career comes to an end, he is studying Clinical Mental Health at Lamar. The plan is to become a Licensed Professional Counselor, and concentrate on the Mental Health of at risk youth, first responders, and veterans. In his free time he spends time in his art studio, chasing grandkids, and an occasional round of golf.

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